As if Dak Prescott needed one more hill to climb on the road to ultimate respect, the Super Bowl came along to deliver a decisive blow to one of the most popular theories about the Cowboys quarterback.

Dak needs to run more.

This is something virtually every Cowboys fan has thought and all of us in the press box have suggested at some point. In the club’s most one-sided game of the season, a 40-7 romp past Jacksonville in Week 6, Prescott ran for 82 yards. The Cowboys need more of that, we all shouted.

Not so fast.

When the Cowboys went 3-5 and had their season on the ropes, Prescott had 247 yards rushing. In the second half when Dallas went 7-1 to win the East, he ran for 58 yards.

New coordinator Kellen Moore was not a gifted runner at any level, so whether he sees more Prescott running as a necessity or even a benefit remains to be seen. With 305 yards rushing, Prescott ranked ninth among quarterbacks last season as rookies Lamar Jackson (who barely played the first half of the season) and Josh Allen led the way, topping 600 yards each.

The notion of the mobile quarterback and the edge that one provides is a popular topic. Always has been. Fifteen years ago we believed Michael Vick was going to revolutionize the game. When I was a (much) younger football writer in the ’80s, we thought Randall Cunningham was going to revolutionize the game. Or we thought Steve Young was going to revolutionize the game.

Randy O.Posts
As if Dak Prescott needed one more hill to climb on the road to ultimate respect, the Super Bowl came along to deliver a decisive blow to one of the most popular theories about the Cowboys quarterback. Dak needs to run more. This is something virtually every Cowboys fan has thought...